womens wall

MILLIONS OF WOMEN IN INDIA JOIN HANDS TO FORM A 385-MILE WALL OF PROTEST... NPR, January 4, 2019 They called it the "women's wall" — vanitha mathil in the local language of Malayalam. According to government estimates published in the Indian press, somewhere between 3.5 million and 5 million women lined up on National Highway 66, a long stretch of road that runs along the country's western coast.

AI BATTLES BLINDNESS

AI BATTLES BLINDNESS... Guardian, Feb 2019 In healthcare, especially in developing countries, AI technology that employs data sets for machine learning is now expected to make rapid strides as an effective screening and diagnostic tool.

TEEN YOGIS DO YOGA ON EGGS, NAILS

NAILED IT! NPR, June 2019 He sat cross-legged in lotus pose for one whole hour — on a board with 2,209 nails. As she sat, her back straight and her eyes gently shut, she says she felt at peace. She was not nervous. And she felt no pain. That feat earned 17-year-old Uttrasree Ilango a spot in the Pathanjali Book of World Records.

doctor kashmir

WHY DOCTORS AND MEDICAL JOURNALS ARE FIGHTING OVER HEALTHCARE IN KASHMIR NPR, August 2019 The crisis in Kashmir has spilled over into medical journals. In an editorial published this month, the Lancet had this to say about the 38,000 Indian security forces reportedly deployed to the region, which is hotly disputed between India and Pakistan: "The militant presence raises serious concerns for the health, safety, and freedoms of the Kashmiri people."

Plant trees for a gun license!

TREES FOR GUNS! NPR, August, 2019 Tajinder Singh, 47, a farmer in the North Indian state of Punjab, applied for a gun license. He told the authorities that he needed a revolver for self-defense. Once the background checks were completed in June this year, Singh was told he had to fulfill one more condition to get his gun...

honesty shops

HONESTY SHOPS NPR, December, 2018 Let's say you're a student in class. There are boxes full of delicious snacks on a table in front of the room: muffins, peanut brittle, candy, samosas (deep-fried potatoes wrapped in a packet of dough). There's a money box next to the snacks. It's up to you whether to pay or not. And nobody's watching. Would you be an honest citizen and toss some coins into the box? Or would you walk off with a snack without chipping in?